Posts Tagged 'symbolic thinking'

Numerosity

There is a very comprehensive review on numerosity and cognitive archaeology by Coolidge and Overmann, in Current Anthropology: numerosity, abstraction, and the emergence of symbolic thinking. The authors propose that numerosity may be a key feature of human brain evolution, integrating information from neuroscience, paleontology, and archaeology. A network based on the integration between frontal and parietal areas may underlie the ability to manage numbers, abstract thinking, language, and metaphor production. The hypothesis is commented by psychologists, archaeologists, neuroanatomists, neurobiologists, and paleontologists.

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RSS Brain News

RSS Cognitive archaeology

  • Squeezing Minds From Stones
    Squeezing Minds From Stones is a collection of essays from early pioneers in the field, like archaeologists Thomas Wynn and Iain Davidson, and evolutionary primatologist William McGrew, to ‘up and coming’ newcomers like Shelby Putt, Ceri Shipton, Mark Moore, James Cole, Natalie Uomini, and Lana Ruck. Their essays address a wide variety of cognitive archaeolo […]

RSS The Skull Box

  • Face and brain
    The brain is a soft-tissue organ surrounded by the bony structure of the skull, where changes in one require changes in the other. From infancy, the bones of the skull are separated by membranous sutures and with rapid brain expansion, these membranous regions of the skull are replaced by bone, fusing the skull into a […]

RSS Anthropology

  • Seven Million Years of Human Evolution
    This fascinating visual presentation from the American Museum of Natural History outlines what we know about human evolution by combining …Continue reading →

RSS Human Evolution

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RSS Neurophilosophy

  • Researchers develop non-invasive deep brain stimulation method
    Researchers at MIT have developed a new method of electrically stimulating deep brain tissues without opening the skullSince 1997, more than 100,000 Parkinson’s Disease patients have been treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS), a surgical technique that involves the implantation of ultra-thin wire electrodes. The implanted device, sometimes referred to as […]

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