Posts Tagged 'sexual dimorphism'

Corpus callosum and allometry

Size and shape variations of the human corpus callosum have always been controversial. Limits in samples and techniques have not helped in this sense. This month we have published a paper on midsagittal shape variation of the corpus callosum. Taking into account the results of this analysis, it seems that the shape differences between males and females are largely allometric. That is, they are secondary consequences of size variation, and not sex-related characters. Differences between groups are, however, very small, mostly because of the large personal differences among individuals. This is probably also due to a limited morphological integration within the corpus callosum, which is influenced by different and independent factors along its outline. It remains to be understood when shape variation is due to intrinsic components of the corpus callosum, and when it is due to indirect influences of external structures.

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