Posts Tagged 'CENIEH'

Human Paleoneurology 2012

On October 18th-19th we celebrate at the CENIEH a symposium on Human Paleoneurology. The meeting will include talks on neuroscience and brain evolution (Chet Sherwood, Washington University), computed tools for paleoneurology (Philipp Gunz, Max Planck Institute), functional craniology and brain morphological integration (Emiliano Bruner, CENIEH), ontogeny and phylogeny (Simon Neubauer, Max Planck Institute), endocranial thermoregulation (José Manuel de la Cuétara, CENIEH), archaeology and behaviour (Natalie Uomini, University of Liverpool), working memory and human evolution (Fred Coolidge, University of Colorado). Participation is free, you just have to send a registration form to comunicacion@cenieh.es, before October 10th. The meeting, sponsored by the Institute Tomás Pascual Sanz, will include on Saturday 20th a visit to the Atapuerca excavation site.

[Registration Form]

[PROGRAM]

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RSS Brain News

RSS Cognitive archaeology

  • BOOK NOTICE: The Forgotten Transition by John Gilbert
    The Forgotten Transition: From event to object and from tool to language. By John Gilbert (2018). Gompel & Svacina, Oud-Turnhout, Belgium. 336 pp. In The Forgotten Transition, John Gilbert (Gilbert, 2018) has taken a novel and provocative look at two components of early hominin cognitive evolution, drawing on philosophical, psychological, and archaeologi […]

RSS The Skull Box

  • Brain regional scaling
    Reardon and colleagues recently published a study on the variation of human brain organization and its relationship with brain size. Using neuroimaging data from more than 3000 individuals they calculated the local surface area and estimated the areal scaling in relation to the total cortical area in order to generate a reference map for areal […]

RSS Anthropology

RSS Human Evolution

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RSS Neurophilosophy

  • Researchers develop non-invasive deep brain stimulation method
    Researchers at MIT have developed a new method of electrically stimulating deep brain tissues without opening the skullSince 1997, more than 100,000 Parkinson’s Disease patients have been treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS), a surgical technique that involves the implantation of ultra-thin wire electrodes. The implanted device, sometimes referred to as […]

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