Archive for the 'Books' Category

Visuospatial behaviours

After the perspective paper on visuospatial cognition and human evolution, and the review on visuospatial integration and the fossil record, we have now published a review article on visuospatial behaviors in archaeology. Here, we introduce and discuss parietal cortex evolution, embodiment, tool use and tool making, wayfinding, and the association between physical, chronological, and social spaces. A main target of cognitive archaeology is to test whether modern human cognition is due to a specific prosthetic capacity that enhances the functional relationships between body and technology, offloading brain functions and outsourcing information process to the enviroment. Something similar happens to … spiders! This chapter is part of a book dedicated to the Evolution of Primate Social Cognition (Springer).

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Digital Endocasts

A new Springer book: Digital Endocasts: from skulls to brains. Chapter 1 (Holloway) is an introduction to physical casting. Chapter 2 (Ogihara et al.) deals with digital reconstructions of Neandertals and early modern humans’ endocasts. Chapter 3 (Kobayashi et al.) is about inferences on cortical subdivision from skull morphology. Chapter 4 (Beaudet and Gilissen) introduces paleoneurology on non-human primates, and Chapter 5 (Walsh and Knoll) is on birds and dinosaurs. Chapter 6 (Rangel de Lázaro et al.) reviews  craniovascular traits. Chapter 7 (Bruner) is on functional craniology and multivatiate statistics. Chapter 8 (Gómez-Robles et al.) concerns brain and landmarks, and Chapter 9 (Pereira-Pedro and Bruner) concerns endocasts and landmarks. Chapter 10 (Dupej et al.) is on endocranial surface comparisons. Chapter 11 (Kochiyama et al.) presents computed tools to infer brain morphology in fossil species. Chapter 12 (Neubauer and Gunz) deals with brain ontogeny and phylogeny. Chapter 13 (Bruner et al.) is on an application of network analysis to brain parcellation and cortical spatial contiguity. Then, there are chapters dedicated to the evolution of the frontal lobes (Chapter 14 – Parks and Smaers), of the parietal lobes (Chapter 15 – Bruner et al.), of the temporal lobes (Chapter 16 – Bryant and Preuss), of the occipital lobes (Chapter 17 – Todorov and de Sousa) and of the cerebellum (Chapter 18 – Tanabe et al.). The aim of the book is to provide a comprehensive perspective on issues associated with endocasts and brain evolution, and to promote a general overview of current methods in paleoneurology. The book has been published within the series “Replacement of Neanderthals by Modern Humans“. Here on the Springer webpage.

Evolution of Nervous Systems

evolution-of-the-nervous-systems-2ed

Second Edition of this outstanding reference in neuroscience and evolution edited by Jon H. Kaas, with four volumes dedicated to vertebrates, mammals, primates, and humans. Here a presentation of the contents, and a chapter on paleoneurology.

Human Paleoneurology

Human Paleoneurology 2014The book “Human Paleoneurology” is now available on the website of the Springer Series in Bio-/Neuroinformatics. There is an introduction by Ralph Holloway, evidencing some open questions on endocasts. Laura Reyes and Chet Sherwood discuss current issues in evolutionary neuroscience. Philipp Gunz talks about computed methods and digital tools used to reconstruct and compare brain forms. I present a review in functional craniology, namely on the structural relationships between brain and braincase. Simon Neubauer focuses on brain evolution in ontogeny and phylogeny, dealing with the variations in brain size and shape. Natalie Uomini provides an archaeological perspective on behaviour. Erin Hecht and Dietrich Stout supply a detailed description of methods and topics in neuroarchaeology. Fred Coolidge, Tom Wynn, Leee Overmann and Jim Hicks present an overview in cognitive archaeology. A set of images by José Manuel de la Cuétara shows cranial and endocranial digital reconstructions of living apes and extinct hominids. Here a list of chapters and authors. This is a comprehensive collection of papers useful for anyone interested in approaching this field, good for teaching and helpful to present the current state-of-the-art of this discipline.

Language and hybrids

JASs2013 (cover)

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We have published the new volume of the Journal of Anthropological Sciences (JASs 2013). It includes many papers on evolution and cognition, mainly on language. The volume  includes reviews on biolinguistics, language evolution, and reproductive isolation in Neandertals. There is a whole forum dedicated to language and hybridization in human evolution, with nine articles discussing issues in paleogenomics. Papers are, as usually, free to download.


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