Parietal cortex

In November 2017 Ashley Morhardt organized a Karger Workshop at Hyattsville (USA), entitled “From fossils to function: integrative and diverse approaches to vertebrate evolutionary neuroscience“. The workshop was included in the activities of the J. B. Johnston Club, and papers are  now published in Brain Behavior and Evolution. My contribution is a review on the evolution of the parietal cortex in the human genus. Articles will be freely accessible for the next six months. Have a look!

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