Surfin’ endocasts

Endocasts and brains are difficult to analyze through traditional anatomical landmarks, because of the smooth morphology, blurred boundaries, and a noticeable individual variation. Currently, semilandmarks and surface analyses are good alternatives. Nonetheless, these two methods analyze the geometry of an “object”, ignoring its anatomical nature. If such geometrical modelling is interpreted too strictly, it may generate speculations and even incorrect conclusions. Numerical transformations behind spatial and geometrical models can be very complex and entangled, and the long chains of algorithms cannot be disentangled in any research article (the same occurs in any other field, like molecular biology, where long chains of reactions and engineering processes can’t be resumed in detail in every single paper and, necessarily, we must blindly rely on their proper functioning). In those many numerical steps, we must be aware that there may be incorrect passages, or simply algebraic assumptions that are not consistent with the real biological and evolutionary processes. More importantly, the brain is formed by so many independent elements, histological components, and cortical areas, and a pooled geometrical analysis can generate hybrid results. Anatomical landmarks are still necessary to mark boundaries and proportions, as to evaluate the real contribution of each element. Of course, anatomical landmarks are difficult to assess, they require experience, and they require inferences: as in every experimental paradigm, as in every field of science. Shape analyses deals with models, not with real anatomical entities. And models only take into considerations some specific properties of those anatomical systems, following algebraic rules that, right or wrong, represent conventional and operational assumptions. Here an opinion paper on all these issues.

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