Parsimony

Mounier et al 2016Paleoneurology is rarely used to test taxonomic or phylogenetic hypotheses, at least for three reasons. First, the biology and variation of many endocranial traits are not even known for living humans. Second, plesiomorph traits, parallelisms, large intra-specific variability, and subtle inter-specific differences, make this issue very difficult to test through robust quantitative approaches. Third, the paucity and fragmentation of the fossil record often hamper meaningful statistical inferences. Of course these same problems concern many other anatomical districts, and that’s why probably morphology is not always recommended as a good and reliable source of taxonomic and phylogenetic information. Despite these limits, Aurelién Mounier and his coauthors have now tried to apply cladistics to paleoneurology, taking into consideration neurocranial and endocranial traits. According to their results, at least modern humans and Neandertals can be properly characterized in terms of braincase morphology, suggesting the existence of an actual phylogenetic signal behind the patterns of endocranial variation.

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