Brain landmarks

Chollet et al 2014There is an interesting analysis by Madeleine Chollet and colleagues on brain landmarking. They analyzed and quantified intra- and inter-observer error when collecting coordinates from 3D digital brains. Results are encouraging, evidencing average errors of 1.9 and 1.1 mm, respectively. However, values are much variable, depending upon the specific brain area. Generally, midsagittal landmarks show less uncertainty than parasagittal ones, and subcortical landmarks are more reliable than cortical ones (good for me: that’s why most of my papers are on midsagittal and subcortical morphology!). The analysis has been performed only on 10 specimens, and larger samples can surely add to the current results. Furthermore, in this study only the left hemisphere has been considered, in which sulci and gyri are generally easier to recognize. Despite these limits, the paper supplies clear results and useful comments. These kinds of analyses are necessary to promote quantitative perspectives in landmark-based morphometrics. For an excellent example of quantitative approach in paleoneurology I recommend to see the article by Simon Neubauer and colleagues on australopiths’ brain size estimations.

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