Neandertal learning

An international conference will be held in Tokyo (18-24 November, 2012) entitled “Replacement of Neanderthals by Modern Humans: Testing Evolutionary Models of Learning”. The meeting is associated with a very large multidisciplinary project aimed at considering Neandertal cognition, evolution, and extinction, in terms of learning capabilities. Anatomists, archaeologists, paleontologists, psychologists, and many specialists from other fields will meet to discuss cognitive differences between modern humans and Neandertals, most of all those possibly involved in the transmission of culture.


0 Responses to “Neandertal learning”

  1. Leave a Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in: Logo

You are commenting using your account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

RSS Brain News

RSS Cognitive archaeology

  • Why Chomsky Is Wrong About the Evolution of Language
    Recently, Chomsky and colleagues (Bolhuis, Tattersal, Chomsky, & Berwick, 2014) published an article entitled How Could Language Have Evolved? The chief irony of the title is that its authors essentially argued that language did not evolve. According to their Strict Minimalist Thesis, language appeared suddenly about 70,000 to 100,000 years ago, and they […]

RSS The Skull Box

  • Cranial thickness
    The cranial vault is composed by three bone layers (inner table, diploe, outer table), and its principal function is to safeguard the brain from impacts. Bone thickness is a crucial parameter to understand the biomechanical factors contributing to skull deformations and fractures after head injury. It is therefore  important to establish an accurate measurem […]

RSS Anthropology

RSS Human Evolution

  • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.

RSS Neurophilosophy

  • Live imaging of synapse density in the human brain
    A new imaging technique may give researchers fresh insights into brain development, function, and diseaseThe human brain is often said to be the most complex object in the known universe, and there’s good reason to believe that it is. That lump of jelly inside your head contains at least 80 billion nerve cells, or neurons, and even more of the non-neuronal c […]


This blog publishes texts and comments of the author, which can not be referred to institutions or contexts outside of the blog itself. The published material may be partly derived or reported from the Web, and therefore evaluated in the public domain. If some content violates copyright or if it is considered inappropriate, please contact me, to promptly remove it. On the other hand, please cite this source whenever using images or texts from this website.

%d bloggers like this: